THE INDIE PROJECT   Inclusion and Diversity in Education (INDIE) is a British Council led project aimed at promoting social cohesion and raising educational standards in culturally inclusive schools. It is run in collaboration with local and regional education authorities from nine EU Member States: Belgium, Germany, Greece, Italy, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom. The words ‘inclusion’ and ‘diversity’ are everywhere nowadays as Europe is becoming increasingly diverse. And where better to start building on our understanding of these terms than in schools? According to research conducted by the British Council in February 2008 across 47 schools in Europe, children find that differences in physical appearance, disability and skin colour are barriers to fitting in at school. They also suggested better induction for migrant children and parents when they start school, and more time to discuss differences in backgrounds and cultures in the classroom. In education, the increase in pupils arriving in schools from new communities is an issue all over Western Europe. One of the major concerns has been the school achievement of learners from these new communities. In the partner countries, inclusion and improving ethnic minority achievement have been affirmed as central goal of education policy. INDIE will build lasting networks which will focus on these common challenges presented by migration and cultural diversity to school education in the participating countries. Uniquely, it brings together pupils, head teachers and policy makers to discuss how inclusion and diversity in schools can best be managed and to implement school based projects which will set best practice standards in the field. School management teams, acting on the European Youth Charter on Inclusion and Diversity in Education, will launch school based projects in the 2008-09 academic year within participating countries. Evaluation of these policies will lead to the publication of shared best practice guidelines for policy makers and school leaders. Throughout the project, the young people involved will be constantly challenged into demonstrating active European citizenship. Charter development and participating in the Brussels conference were just starting points. Ahead lie poetry workshops with Levi Tafari and the launch of an anthology related to their experience, a Visual Arts exhibition and the project will sign off with young leaders organising simultaneous events to mark their identity as Next Generation Europeans. Our success strategy: our simultaneous ‘bottom up & top down’ approach; in dealing with decision makers thus ensuring a real voice for young people and that they have the opportunity to set the agenda.

THE INDIE PROJECT

Inclusion and Diversity in Education (INDIE) is a British Council led project aimed at promoting social cohesion and raising educational standards in culturally inclusive schools. It is run in collaboration with local and regional education authorities from nine EU Member States: Belgium, Germany, Greece, Italy, Malta, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain and the United Kingdom. The words ‘inclusion’ and ‘diversity’ are everywhere nowadays as Europe is becoming increasingly diverse. And where better to start building on our understanding of these terms than in schools? According to research conducted by the British Council in February 2008 across 47 schools in Europe, children find that differences in physical appearance, disability and skin colour are barriers to fitting in at school. They also suggested better induction for migrant children and parents when they start school, and more time to discuss differences in backgrounds and cultures in the classroom. In education, the increase in pupils arriving in schools from new communities is an issue all over Western Europe. One of the major concerns has been the school achievement of learners from these new communities. In the partner countries, inclusion and improving ethnic minority achievement have been affirmed as central goal of education policy. INDIE will build lasting networks which will focus on these common challenges presented by migration and cultural diversity to school education in the participating countries. Uniquely, it brings together pupils, head teachers and policy makers to discuss how inclusion and diversity in schools can best be managed and to implement school based projects which will set best practice standards in the field. School management teams, acting on the European Youth Charter on Inclusion and Diversity in Education, will launch school based projects in the 2008-09 academic year within participating countries. Evaluation of these policies will lead to the publication of shared best practice guidelines for policy makers and school leaders. Throughout the project, the young people involved will be constantly challenged into demonstrating active European citizenship. Charter development and participating in the Brussels conference were just starting points. Ahead lie poetry workshops with Levi Tafari and the launch of an anthology related to their experience, a Visual Arts exhibition and the project will sign off with young leaders organising simultaneous events to mark their identity as Next Generation Europeans. Our success strategy: our simultaneous ‘bottom up & top down’ approach; in dealing with decision makers thus ensuring a real voice for young people and that they have the opportunity to set the agenda.

L8 UNSPOKEN   Liverpool 8 spoken word artists celebrate iconic Granby Four Streetson film and online. First the renovation of Victorian homes around Granby Street in Toxteth attracted a Turner Prize nomination - now nine Liverpool spoken word artists have recorded their poems inspired by Toxteth on those same streets as part of the L8 Unspoken film and web project. In a unique collaboration for the L8 Unseen project, has been screened for the ongoing exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool, the nine poets braved the summer rains on Saturday 1 August to film performances of their work on and around Liverpool 8’s iconic Granby Four Streets: Cairns, Ducie, Cawdor and Eversley Streets. The L8 Unseen exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool highlights the rich diversity of this area to the south of the city and celebrates the lives and experiences of its inhabitants. The exhibition has already received over 360,000 visitors since Easter. This unique series of spoken word short films will be shown on the large screen in the exhibition (20th August) throughout the day until the exhibition closes on 6 September 2015. Some of the poets; Sandi Hughes, Tommy Calderbank, Ann Lopez and Abdul Malik Al Nasir, were featured as subjects for portraits in the original exhibition. A further five poets, also with roots in Toxteth, were identified by producers B3 Media and all nine were invited to write poems inspired by their passion for the neighbourhood. The nine poets were; Nikki Blaze, Sara Yekutiel, Levi Tafari, Curtis Watt, Lewis Farmer, Tom Calderbank, Sandi Hughes, Ann Lopez and Abdul Malik Al Nasir. L8 Unspoke was shot for B3 Media by Ian Lysaght and Jah Jussa from Tabacula and produced by Marc Boothe

L8 UNSPOKEN

Liverpool 8 spoken word artists celebrate iconic Granby Four Streetson film and online. First the renovation of Victorian homes around Granby Street in Toxteth attracted a Turner Prize nomination - now nine Liverpool spoken word artists have recorded their poems inspired by Toxteth on those same streets as part of the L8 Unspoken film and web project. In a unique collaboration for the L8 Unseen project, has been screened for the ongoing exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool, the nine poets braved the summer rains on Saturday 1 August to film performances of their work on and around Liverpool 8’s iconic Granby Four Streets: Cairns, Ducie, Cawdor and Eversley Streets. The L8 Unseen exhibition at the Museum of Liverpool highlights the rich diversity of this area to the south of the city and celebrates the lives and experiences of its inhabitants. The exhibition has already received over 360,000 visitors since Easter. This unique series of spoken word short films will be shown on the large screen in the exhibition (20th August) throughout the day until the exhibition closes on 6 September 2015. Some of the poets; Sandi Hughes, Tommy Calderbank, Ann Lopez and Abdul Malik Al Nasir, were featured as subjects for portraits in the original exhibition. A further five poets, also with roots in Toxteth, were identified by producers B3 Media and all nine were invited to write poems inspired by their passion for the neighbourhood. The nine poets were; Nikki Blaze, Sara Yekutiel, Levi Tafari, Curtis Watt, Lewis Farmer, Tom Calderbank, Sandi Hughes, Ann Lopez and Abdul Malik Al Nasir. L8 Unspoke was shot for B3 Media by Ian Lysaght and Jah Jussa from Tabacula and produced by Marc Boothe

BLACK POPPIES   Writing on the Wall presented a fascinating archive of letters and documents highlighting the plight of black soldiers, seafarers, and workers in Liverpool following demobilisation in 1919. This archive contains testimony from men from the Caribbean, West Africa and other colonial territories, who had fought for England on land and at sea during the Great War and were then left stranded, destitute and subject to racial violence on the streets of Liverpool. As part of the Weeping Window experience, Writing on the Wall invited members of the public to join internationally renowned poet Levi Tafari in exploring the lives of these men and their families and to respond creatively through story-telling and poetry. These creative writing workshops included a guided tour of the archive. The project also involved creating ceramic black poppies with visual artist Faith Bebbington which were exhibited at Liverpool's Central Library and toured venues around the city. The project attracted media attention nationally.

BLACK POPPIES

Writing on the Wall presented a fascinating archive of letters and documents highlighting the plight of black soldiers, seafarers, and workers in Liverpool following demobilisation in 1919. This archive contains testimony from men from the Caribbean, West Africa and other colonial territories, who had fought for England on land and at sea during the Great War and were then left stranded, destitute and subject to racial violence on the streets of Liverpool. As part of the Weeping Window experience, Writing on the Wall invited members of the public to join internationally renowned poet Levi Tafari in exploring the lives of these men and their families and to respond creatively through story-telling and poetry. These creative writing workshops included a guided tour of the archive. The project also involved creating ceramic black poppies with visual artist Faith Bebbington which were exhibited at Liverpool's Central Library and toured venues around the city. The project attracted media attention nationally.

 
POEM IN LIVERPOOL CENTRAL LIBRARY   To coincide with the reopening of the newly redeveloped Liverpool Central Library in 2013. Levi Tafari was commissioned to create a poem which is now ecthed instone at the entrance to the librarywelcoming visitors to the library.  The poem "The Daughter of Merseyside" which celebrates Liverpool's rich heritage, history, arts and culture is the centre piece on the ground floor of the library.

POEM IN LIVERPOOL CENTRAL LIBRARY

To coincide with the reopening of the newly redeveloped Liverpool Central Library in 2013. Levi Tafari was commissioned to create a poem which is now ecthed instone at the entrance to the librarywelcoming visitors to the library.

The poem "The Daughter of Merseyside" which celebrates Liverpool's rich heritage, history, arts and culture is the centre piece on the ground floor of the library.

FROM GREAT WAR TO RACE RIOTS   Writing on the Wall have been presented with a number of original, significant documents covering the period 1919 to 1921, by community member and activist Joe Farrag. This archive relates to the position of black ex-servicemen, seamen and factory workers stranded or left destitute in Liverpool after the First World War. It includes letters and testimony from soldiers and merchant seamen from Africa and the Caribbean, who had fought for England on land and at sea during the Great War of 1914, or had worked in factories to support the war effort. The documents reveal a plight of daily racism and loss of jobs because of the boycott by white workers, a boycott often supported by the trades unions. This tension led to the race riots of 1919, which resulted in many serious assaults and attacks and the death of Charles Wootton, a black seaman murdered by a white mob. The unique nature of this material is that it contains the written word of those ex-servicemen, sailors and workers who were being confronted with verbal, physical and racial abuse on the streets of Liverpool, abuse which was compounded by institutional indifference or racism. Levi Tafari through Writing On the Wall and the Museum of Liverpool Life ran a series of creative writing workshops with local schools to produce a creative response to the letters and make the students aware of this chapter of British history that was hidden. The project was featured in a series broadcasted on BBC TV presented by David Olusoga as part of the "Black and British: A forgotten history" season.

FROM GREAT WAR TO RACE RIOTS

Writing on the Wall have been presented with a number of original, significant documents covering the period 1919 to 1921, by community member and activist Joe Farrag. This archive relates to the position of black ex-servicemen, seamen and factory workers stranded or left destitute in Liverpool after the First World War. It includes letters and testimony from soldiers and merchant seamen from Africa and the Caribbean, who had fought for England on land and at sea during the Great War of 1914, or had worked in factories to support the war effort. The documents reveal a plight of daily racism and loss of jobs because of the boycott by white workers, a boycott often supported by the trades unions. This tension led to the race riots of 1919, which resulted in many serious assaults and attacks and the death of Charles Wootton, a black seaman murdered by a white mob. The unique nature of this material is that it contains the written word of those ex-servicemen, sailors and workers who were being confronted with verbal, physical and racial abuse on the streets of Liverpool, abuse which was compounded by institutional indifference or racism. Levi Tafari through Writing On the Wall and the Museum of Liverpool Life ran a series of creative writing workshops with local schools to produce a creative response to the letters and make the students aware of this chapter of British history that was hidden. The project was featured in a series broadcasted on BBC TV presented by David Olusoga as part of the "Black and British: A forgotten history" season.

CONTINUING THE JOURNEY   Continuing the Journey is an exhibition developed by Stray Cat Media. The exhibition is a multi-media collection of oral histories, photographs and films exploring issues which affect people of African heritage born, raised or living in Liverpool's locality. The public was given the opportunity to learn about the struggle of Merseyside's Black community to obtain racial equality and social justice from post war Britain to the 1980's. the participants of the project shared recollections of brutal and traumatic experiences which left indelible marks on their community. the project aims to reflect the resilience, strength and power of each individual, and is dedicated to the voices that were heard and those who were not. Levi Tafari was one of the participants in the exhibition and also writer in residence for the project, running a series of workshops in local schools, adult groups and at the International Slavery Museum Liverpool UK. Levi also created a poem to launch the exhibition. The project was a huge success and gained media attention. Levi was also a panellist in a debate based around the exhibition.

CONTINUING THE JOURNEY

Continuing the Journey is an exhibition developed by Stray Cat Media. The exhibition is a multi-media collection of oral histories, photographs and films exploring issues which affect people of African heritage born, raised or living in Liverpool's locality. The public was given the opportunity to learn about the struggle of Merseyside's Black community to obtain racial equality and social justice from post war Britain to the 1980's. the participants of the project shared recollections of brutal and traumatic experiences which left indelible marks on their community. the project aims to reflect the resilience, strength and power of each individual, and is dedicated to the voices that were heard and those who were not. Levi Tafari was one of the participants in the exhibition and also writer in residence for the project, running a series of workshops in local schools, adult groups and at the International Slavery Museum Liverpool UK. Levi also created a poem to launch the exhibition. The project was a huge success and gained media attention. Levi was also a panellist in a debate based around the exhibition.

POETRY QUEST   PoetryQuest is a national arts project supported by The Prince's Foundation for Children and the Arts. The project links arts venues with their local primary schools and will introduce children to the world of performance poetry. Over the course of their PoetryQuest, students visited their partner arts venue and work with professional poets, venue staff and arts educators to engage with poetry.PoetryQuest began with a visit by participants to see contemporary performance poetry at their local arts venue. The visit not only introduces the young people to the venue, but also, with support from venue staff and professional poets, engages them with poetry as an exciting art form. This initial visit builds the foundations of a lasting relationship between the young people, schools and venues that will endure beyond the project. Having seen poetry in performance, the participants worked on their own poetry, with support from in-school workshops delivered by their partner poets. The project culminated in a celebratory finale event at the partner venue where the young people performed their poems in front of their peers, teachers, families, as well as all the other adults and children involved in the project. Levi Tafari along with Poet Mandy Coe facilitated and lead a series of poetry workshops in Hume/ Mossside in six primary schools in Manchester. The project concluded with the student performing their work at the Royal Exchange Theatre Manchester. The PoetryQuest project was so well received by Manchester's participants that Levi and Mandy Coe lead the PoetryQuest project in Liverpool, working in six primary schools in Toxteth and the city centre. The Liverpool PoetryQuest concluded with a performance at Liverpool's Play House Theatre.A PoetryQuest Book for Teachers aims to support the delivery of the project in schools, and create a lasting legacy: providing practical tips for holding school poetry projects and activities that can be used in the classroom.

POETRY QUEST

PoetryQuest is a national arts project supported by The Prince's Foundation for Children and the Arts. The project links arts venues with their local primary schools and will introduce children to the world of performance poetry. Over the course of their PoetryQuest, students visited their partner arts venue and work with professional poets, venue staff and arts educators to engage with poetry.PoetryQuest began with a visit by participants to see contemporary performance poetry at their local arts venue. The visit not only introduces the young people to the venue, but also, with support from venue staff and professional poets, engages them with poetry as an exciting art form. This initial visit builds the foundations of a lasting relationship between the young people, schools and venues that will endure beyond the project. Having seen poetry in performance, the participants worked on their own poetry, with support from in-school workshops delivered by their partner poets. The project culminated in a celebratory finale event at the partner venue where the young people performed their poems in front of their peers, teachers, families, as well as all the other adults and children involved in the project. Levi Tafari along with Poet Mandy Coe facilitated and lead a series of poetry workshops in Hume/ Mossside in six primary schools in Manchester. The project concluded with the student performing their work at the Royal Exchange Theatre Manchester. The PoetryQuest project was so well received by Manchester's participants that Levi and Mandy Coe lead the PoetryQuest project in Liverpool, working in six primary schools in Toxteth and the city centre. The Liverpool PoetryQuest concluded with a performance at Liverpool's Play House Theatre.A PoetryQuest Book for Teachers aims to support the delivery of the project in schools, and create a lasting legacy: providing practical tips for holding school poetry projects and activities that can be used in the classroom.